Blog

Blog

Game Time: Women Dominate with Mobile Gaming Apps

Posted Aug 18, 2014

Think gaming is a just man’s world? Think again. While men may be more invested in what’s traditionally thought of as “hardcore” game, some new stats from Flurry show that women are more engaged when it comes to mobile games. And even more interesting, women aren’t just outplaying men – they’re outspending them.

Light up the scoreboard.

Flurry recently released some stats that shed light on the different ways that men and women engage with mobile games. Based on analysis of players across over 1.1 million devices, the report found that woman beat men in three specific mobile gaming areas.

Women 3, Men O

First, Flurry found that women spend 35 percent more time overall in gaming apps than men. They’re also much more likely come back for more. Over a 7-day period, the retention rate for female players in a single game is around 42 percent higher than males.

But in addition to giving more time than their male counterparts, women also invest more money. They’re about 31 percent more likely to make in-app purchases than men.

Flurry money time and retention with women in games chart

And look no further than the feverish coverage of the female-focused, free-to-play Kim Kardashian: Hollywood for more proof. Developer Glu Mobile says that in-app purchases reached nearly $1.6 million in the game’s first five days on the market, and if the popularity persists, some financial analysts predict it’ll make $200 million in revenue from players annually.

Gender Differentials

Of course, not every game has the celebrity-driven buzz of a Kardashian. But mobile game developers with in-app purchases on the brain might want to think about some of the differences in terms of genre.

Puzzle games, for example, were found to be gender neutral. The report showed that men play more shooting, sports, action, battle and strategy games than women. On the flip side, women tend to play more quiz, card, slot, simulation and social games.

While these gender distinctions are undoubtedly interesting and food for developer thought, we think the Flurry report offers more than just cultural insight. It’s one more example of how analytics, insights and data about your target audience can be useful for crafting an overall marketing and revenue-generation strategy.

Photo credit: Flurry

Latest at AdColony